CARRENDER WILLIAM GEORGE CIVIL WAR
MOUND CITY NATIONAL CEMETERY
, Plot: E 0 3048, bur. 01/06/1865

Mound City National Cemetery is one of the twelve original National cemeteries. It was established in 1864 pursuant to the Act of July 17, 1862, whereby President Lincoln was authorized “to purchase cemetery grounds to be used as a National Cemetery for soldiers who shall have died in the service of their country.” The land was purchased by the United States in two separate parcels from S.S. Taylor and Edwin Parsons, Trustees. It is located near the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers. Large army general hospitals were located at Mound City and Cairo IL to care for civil war casualties. The establishment of these large hospitals was a determining factor in the location of the cemetery at Mound City.


48th REGIMENT MO INFANTRY.
Organized at St. Louis, Jefferson City and Rolla, Mo., August 3-November 22, 1864. Attached to District of Rolla, Dept. of Missouri, to December, 1864. Railroad Guard, Tennessee & Alabama Railroad, Dept. of the Cumberland, to February, 1865. Camp Douglas, Chicago, Ill., to June, 1865.

SERVICE-Duty at Rolla. Mo., till December 9,1864. Defence of Rolla against Price. Moved to Nashville, Tenn., December 9-19. Assigned to post duty at Columbia, Tenn., and garrison block houses on Tennessee & Alabama Railroad from Franklin to Tailoka till February, 1865. Moved to Chicago, Ill., February 18-22. Guard duty at Camp Douglas and escort ConfederatE prisoners to City Point, Va., for exchange till June 16 Ordered to Benton Barracks, Mo., June 16. Mustered out June 22, 1865.


WILLIAM GEORGE CARRENDER

George W. and Mary A. Carrender (OUR GGRANDPARENTS) became parents of three sons born between 1860 and 1865. The sons were James H. Carrender b. c/1861 m. Harriett Pinkston 1880; William George Carrender b. 1862 m. Sarah Leona Harrison 1881; and Joel J. Carrender b. c/1865 m. Henrietta/Nettie Heldstab 1885.

Sometime before August 1866, George W. Carrender died and there is the possibility he was a casualty of the Civil War. It was in August 1866 that his widow, Mary A. Carrender, married Robert R. Stansberry. They had a daughter, Minerva Lee, who was a half sister to James, William, and Joel Carrender. By 1870, Mary was once again alone with four children in her home---James 9 years old, William 8, Joel J. 5, and Minerva/Mary Lee age 1 month. Minerva married George W. Hicks in 1885 when very young. The census gave her name as Mary Lee Stansberry, but her marriage records give her name as Minerva Lee Carrender.

William George Carrender was born in Miller County , near Mt. Pleasant , on May 3, 1862, a son of George W. Carrender (born c/1839) and his wife, Mary Ann Winneford or Hicks No record was found of their marriage in Miller County , but according to the 1860 census, they were newly-married. She was 17 years of age and George was 21. William was a grandson of Alfred and Elizabeth Carrender, early settlers of the county. They were in Miller County during the first county census, taken in 1840.

George W. and Mary A. Carrender (OUR GGRANDPARENTS) became parents of three sons born between 1860 and 1865. The sons were James H. Carrender b. c/1861 m. Harriett Pinkston 1880; William George Carrender b. 1862 m. Sarah Leona Harrison 1881; and Joel J. Carrender b. c/1865 m. Henrietta/Nettie Heldstab 1885.

Sometime before August 1866, George W. Carrender died and there is the possibility he was a casualty of the Civil War. It was in August 1866 that his widow, Mary A. Carrender, married Robert R. Stansberry. They had a daughter, Minerva Lee Stansberry who was a half sister to James, William, and Joel Carrender. By 1870, Mary was once again alone with four children in her home---James 9 years old, William 8, Joel J. 5, and Minerva/Mary Lee age 1 month. Minerva married George W. Hicks in 1885 when very young. The census gave her name as Mary Lee Stansberry, but her marriage records give her name as Minerva Lee Carrender.

William George Carrender married Sarah Leona Harrison on August 14, 1881(OUR GREAT GANDPARENTS). She was a daughter of William T. Harrison (born in Kentucky ) who was living in Equality Township in 1880. William and Sarah Leona became parents of seven children including Herbert O. Carrender b. Jan 1882 m Jean William Oscar Eldridge Carrender b. Oct 1883 m. Emma Pauline Williams 1910; Charles J. Carrender b. Sep 1885 m. Nora Brockman 1907; Willard A. Carrender b. Oct 1887 m. Ida Bell Heldstab; (OUR GRANDPARENTS) Lela M. Carrender b. Nov 1891; Annie J. Carrender b. Feb 1896; and Essie Carrender (born after 1900). I don't know if any of the three daughters married because they were still living at home when their father died in 1922.

William was a farmer and stockman of the Equality/Saline townships area for over 30 years. About a week before his death on March 7, 1922, William exchanged his farm with his youngest son, Willard, and took the son's residence in Eldon. William had become quite ill during the influenza plague that hit America in the era of 1918-20 and never fully recovered from the illness. He gave up farming to move to Eldon, but only lived for a short time after the move.
At his death he was survived by his wife, Leona; his seven children; 10 grandchildren; one brother, Joel Carrender of Eldon; his half-sister, Mrs. George Hicks of Eldon; and a half-brother, L. F. Russell of Algire, MO....(NOTE: I still haven't figured out who the half brother was). He was buried at Salem Cemetery, north of Eldon. His wife lived for 40 years after William's death and died on July 12, 1962. She was buried beside William at Salem Cemetery.



MISSOURI VOLUNTEER FORCES IN THE CIVIL WAR with Federal Service (UNION): 48th REGIMENT MO INFANTRY.